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Spanish psycho-educational programs at St. Nicholas Church

“Controlling our Anxiety in Times of Uncertainty”

This presentation is in Spanish and will offer participants the opportunity to identify qualities and tools offered by the Latino culture, and how to utilize them in times of uncertainty.

Date: February 25, 2017
Time: 9:15a-11:00a
Location: Pope John XXIII School at Saint Nicholas Parish in Evanston (off Ridge, past Main St.

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NRCI’S 16TH ANNUAL COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH CONFERENCE

“RAISING RESILIENT CHILDREN: PRIORITIZING THEIR MENTAL HEALTH”

SUNDAY, JUNE 4TH 9:30 A.M. TO 3:15 P.M. AT BETH EMET THE FREE SYNAGOGUE

OPENING THE CONFERENCE IS RABBI ELEANOR SMITH, MD

THE PANEL INCLUDES:

  • LOUIS KRAUS MD, DIRECTOR OF CHILD PSYCHIATRY AT RUSH UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER; ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRY AT RUSH MEDICAL CENTER

“CHILDREN CAN BE AMAZINGLY RESILIENT WHETHER FROM TRAUMA, DEVELOPMENTAL DELAYS, EDUCATIONAL STRUGGLES OR MENTAL ILLNESS. THEY ARE YOUNG AND FRAGILE. PREVENTION AND EARLY INTERVENTION IS KEY TO HELPING OUR CHILDREN.“ DR. KRAUS

  • MARK REINECKE Ph. D., PROFESSOR AND CHIEF PSYCHOLOGIST, DIVISION OF PSYCHOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHIATRY AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES, FEINBERG SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY

“RESILIENCE: THE ABILITY TO RESPOND TO LIFE’S TRAVAILS WITH POISE AND CONFIDENCE IS AMONG THE MOST VALUABLE GIFTS.” DR. REINECKE

  • CHRISTINE WALKER, MPPA, FOUNDER OF CHASING HOPE FOUNDATION ESTABLISHED TO ASSIST FAMILIES LIKE HER OWN WHO ARE RAISING A CHILD WITH AUTISM AND RELATED BRAIN DISORDERS
  • SCHUYLER WALKER, AT 16 IS A SEASONED ADVOCATE HAVING MADE SEVERAL TRIPS TO SPRINGFIELD AND WASHINGTON TO HELP OFFICIALS BETTER UNDERSTAND ISSUES OF MENTAL HEALTH, SPECIAL EDUCATION AND BRAIN RESEARCH
  • TIFFANY MASSON Psy. D., DEAN OF THE CHICAGO SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL PSYCHOLOGY, CHICAGO CAMPUS WILL MODERATE THE DAY.

FOLLOWING THE PANEL PRESENTATIONS AND QUESTION AND ANSWERS, THERE WILL BE 19 DISCUSSION GROUPS DEALING WITH ISSUES THAT AFFECT CHILDREN ON A DAILY BASIS LED BY EXPERIENCED PROFESSIONALS.

DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY, GRIEF AND LOSS, HOW VIOLENCE AFFECTS THEIR LIVES, EARLY CHILDHOOD, HOW SCHOOLS CAN HELP WITH CHILDREN’S BEHAVIORAL AND EDUCATIONAL NEEDS, THE POSITIVE ROLE OF COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS, COPING WITH THOUGHTS AND EMOTIONS, CHILDREN WHO LEARN AND SEE THE WORLD DIFFERENTLY, A CHILD’S EXPERIENCE WITH A MILITARY PARENT, THE ROLE OF PEERS, ALLOWING YOUR CHILD TO TAKE RISKS, DIGITAL KIDS, SPIRITUALITY, STRAIGHT TALK ON DRUG USE AND SEXUALITY,THE ROLE OF PEERS, BUILDING CULTURAL COMPETENCE IN THE AFRICAN AMERICAN COMMUNITY, LATINO COMMUNITY.

AT LAST YEAR’S CONFERENCE, ONE OF THE ATTENDEES WROTE: I WALK INTO BETH EMET AND THE VERY AIR IS BREATHING PLEASANTLY AND IT IS TRULY A DAY WITH WORDS OF RIGHTNESS. BEING THERE AND HEARING SO MANY WORDS SPOKEN THAT CAUSES HEARTS TO SING IS A HAPPINESS WORTH MANY DAYS AND NIGHTS OF WAITING.

IT WAS AN AMAZING BLESSING TO HAVE BEEN AT SUCH AN EVENT.

PLEASE NOTE: BASED ON THE OVERWHELMING POSITIVE RESPONSE TO ANNOUNCING THERE WOULD BE NO CHARGE FOR THE DAY, THE INSTITUTE HAS DECIDED THAT THERE WILL NOT BE A CHARGE FOR ATTENDANCE. WE WILL HAVE A SUGGESTED VOLUNTARY DONATION FOR REGISTRATION.

REGISTRATION WILL BEGIN IN FEBRUARY

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Spanish psycho-educational programs at St. Nicholas Church

A group of Latino parents learned about the changes in the immigration programs and the impact it will have on immigrant communities from respected experts. The next presentation will be “From Healthy Parents, Healthy Children”

Date: January 28, 2017
Time: 9:15a-11:00a
Location: Pope John XXIII School at Saint Nicholas Parish in Evanston (off Ridge, past Main St.

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“Understanding the Challenges Faced by Latina/o Immigrants in the Trump Era”

Over 50 students and community members attended the panel presentation hosted by Naomi Ruth Cohen Institute, Center for Latino/a Mental Health, and Latino/a Students and Friends Association. The panel presentation was broadcasted online and can be accessible at https://livestream.com/accounts/22153488/events/6677979 for those who could not attend.

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“Understanding the Challenges Faced by Latina/o Immigrants in the Trump Era”

Naomi Ruth Cohen Institute, Center for Latino/a Mental Health, and Latino/a Students and Friends Association invite you to attend a panel discussion on the future of immigration issues.

Presenters:

Oscar A. Chacon is co-founder and current executive director of Alliance Americas. Oscar has held leadership roles for multiple local, national, and international organizations including Oxfam America, Centro Presente, and the Heartland Alliance for Human Needs and Human Rights. Oscar is also a frequent spokesperson for diverse audiences and media about economic, social, political and cultural issues related to communities of Latin America origin in the United States of America.

Claudia Lucero is the Executive Director at Chicago Religious Leadership Network on Latin America (CRLN), an organization that focuses on building partnerships among social movements and organize communities.

Dr. Nayeli Chavez, Associate Professor at TCSPP. Dr. Chavez has profound knowledge and experience working with immigrant, Latino/a, and African-American communities. Dr. Chavez’s research and scholarly work includes: Race and racial relations, barriers to mental health service provision of Latino/a clients, culturally based teaching approaches, and implicit bias.

 

DATE: Thursday, December 1, 2016
PLACE: 325 N. Wells St., Room 412
TIME: Noon until 1:30PM
COST is FREE

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“Una communidad informada es una communidad preparada!”

“An informed community is a prepared community”

This presentation is to learn about the changes in the immigration programs as a result of the recent presidential elections and the impact on our immigrant communities.

Presenters:

Oscar A. Chacon is co-founder and current executive director of Alliance Americas. Oscar has held leadership roles for multiple local, national, and international organizations including Oxfam America, Centro Presente, and the Heartland Alliance for Human Needs and Human Rights. Oscar is also a frequent spokesperson for diverse audiences and media about economic, social, political and cultural issues related to communities of Latin America origin in the United States of America.

Dr. Theresa Segura-Herrera, who for the last 15 years has worked closely providing therapy to adults, children, families and couples within the Latino community.

Corina Ratz, M.A. LCPC is licensed mental health provider who has worked extensively with the Latino community over the past 10 years. Her clinical work has included working as a bilingual/ Spanish speaking therapist within hospital inpatient and outpatient settings. She currently sees individual and Latino couples in a private practice setting.

DATE:
Saturday, November 19, 2016
PLACE
Pope John XXIII School at Saint Nicholas Parish in Evanston (off Ridge, past Main St.)
TIME
9:15 AM – 11 AM
COST
FREE

QUESTIONS? Please contact Erika Garcia at (312)410-8967
or email NRCinstitute@thechicagoschool.edu

English

Spanish

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“Strengthening Family Relations through communication between parents”

A series of four presentations in Spanish. The presentations have the purpose of providing information about issues of great importance to Hispanic/Latino families.

This presentation will be provided in Spanish in order to highlight and reduce the stigma associated with couple’s therapy in the Latino community. The presentation will provide information about culturally-informed practices to promote healthy couple and familial functioning.
Co-presenters:

  • Theresa Segura-Herrera, Ph.D., Licensed psychologist, is faculty at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology. She has worked closely providing therapy to adults, children, families and couples within the Latino community over the last 15 years. She currently sees couples of diverse backgrounds in a private practice setting.
  • Corina Ratz, M.A. LCPC is licensed mental health provider who has worked extensively with the Latino community over the past 10 years. Her clinical work has included working as a bilingual/ Spanish speaking therapist within hospital inpatient and outpatient settings. She currently sees individual and Latino couples in a private practice setting.

DATE:
Saturday, October 22, 2016
PLACE
Pope John XXIII School at Saint Nicholas Parish in Evanston (off Ridge, past Main St.)
TIME
9:15 AM – 11 AM
COST
FREE

QUESTIONS? Please contact Erika Garcia at (312)410-8967
or email NRCinstitute@thechicagoschool.edu

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Les invitamos cordialmente a nuestra próxima presentación:
“Fortaleciendo el ambiente familiar atreves de la comunicación entre padres”

Esta presentación en español le dará la oportunidad de conocer acerca de prácticas que toman en cuenta los valores culturales para promover un mejor manejo de las relaciones familiares y de pareja.
Co-presentadores:

  • Dr. Theresa Segura-Herrera, profesora en el departamento de consejería de Psicología en la escuela de Psicología Professional de Chicago. Dr. Segura-Herrera se ha enfocado en la terapia de adultos, niños, familias y parejas Latinas por más de 15 años. Dr. Segura-Herrera trabaja con parejas de diversas nacionalidades en su práctica privada.
  • Corina Ratz, M.A. LCPC, es una consejera licenciada quien ha trabajado por más de 10 años con comunidades Latinas. Su experiencia clínica y el hecho de que es bilingüe le ha permitido trabajar como terapista en hospitales tanto con pacientes internos como también con pacientes fuera del hospital. Corina, trabaja con individuos y parejas Latinas en su práctica privada.

FECHA
Sábado, 22 de octubre, 2016
LUGAR
Pope John XXIII School at Saint Nicholas Parish in Evanston (off Ridge, past Main St.)
HORA
9:15 AM – 11 AM
COSTO
GRATIS

PREGUNTAS? Comuníquese con Erika Garcia (312) 410-8967
ó envía un correo electrónico a:
NRCinstitute@thechicagoschool.edu

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Photos from June 5, 2016 Mental Health Conference

Front

Back Row: TCS ES President Dr. Michael Horowitz, Chicago Campus President Dr. Michele Nealson-Woods, Sheriff Thomas J. Dart of Cook County, NRCI Founder Larry Cohen, Mark Salzer, Ph. D., Professor at Temple University, Jesse Teverbaugh, Director of Cara Program, Interim Chief Academic Officer Dr. Ted Scholz, and Interim Chicago Campus Dean Dr. Tiffany Masson. Front Row: NRCI Founder Marilyn Cohen and NRCI Director Mayra Chacon.

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NAOMI RUTH COHEN INSTITUTE RECOGNIZED IN HONG KONG

When it was time for 12 year old Chasya Cohen, daughter of Eli and Rachel Cohen, granddaughter to NRCI founders Larry and Marilyn to present as her Tzedukah Project, (the obligation to do what is right and just in Judaism) her goal was to   raise money for this organization.   “I chose the Naomi Ruth Cohen Institute because it is really important to me and it was started about my grandparents,” Chasya explained.

The Family lives in Hong Kong and when Chasya presented her project in front of her Bat Mitzvah Class, she introduced NRCI to an entirely new and international audience.

Chaysa’s mom Rachel, wrote, “When the tragedy of Naomi’s death hit the family, Marilyn and Larry reacted in the best way possible: they chose to invest their talents and support mental health sufferers and those who love them.”

 She continued, “Although the two never knew each other, I am certain they would have had a special connection. And the fact that Chasya is already seeking out that connection now, shows a lineage the two have in common: an uncommon empathy for other human beings.”

Well done, Chasya!!

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The Mental Health Education Training at Evanston Township Highschool (ETHS)

In 2015, Evanston Community Foundation awarded a grant to Naomi Ruth Institute with the goal to create a positive change towards mental health related issues. Evanston Township High School students received training on mental health topics that impact high school students. The comprehensive mental health-training curriculum encompassed: General Facilitation Training, How Does Social Media Affect Our Relationships, and Social Media & Substance Use. Training sessions offered to the students were a combination of lectures, short guided activities, and discussions. On May 31, 2016, the Community Education for Youths in Evanston was successfully completed.

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The 2016 Conference Attendees Have Spoken

We saw great success at the 2016 Community Mental Health Conference. More than 300 people attended and we had several dynamic, knowledgeable speakers, including Cook County Sheriff Thomas J. Dart, Temple University professor Dr. Mark Salzer, McGaw YMCA CEO Mark Dennis and CARA Program Director Jesse Teverbaugh. Our speakers captivated attendees as they imparted their knowledge about mental health and taking care of the most vulnerable.

The best way we determine how successful our annual conference has been is through the reaction of attendees, and this year’s conference goers had many wonderful things to say.

“I must admit that if at times I felt along(sic) and isolated in my plight, this counts as one of the days I felt the farthest from the lonely view.”

 “I had the most magnificent time… I had the great pleasure of interacting with other professionals and the guest speakers provided captivating testimonials.”

“This conference gave me the opportunity to see that we still need other alternatives to helping people with mental illness.”

“Reaffirmed {my} hope in mental health.”

Other attendees mentioned having renewed hope as one of the benefits of the conference as well, which pleases us because the conference, this year titled, “Mental Health: Why does it Matter? A Compassionate Community Responds,” was, as founder Lawrence Cohen expressed early on, “designed not only to inform and teach, but also to enable us all to learn more about the most vulnerable in our society, and how each of us can help.”

Our call for help in accomplishing this did not go unheeded as we hosted an unprecedented 21 discussion groups, all with presenters who were excited to talk about and share information on what they know so much about.  Attendees were treated to discussion groups featuring such heady topics as loss through violent death, restorative justice with a trauma informed lenses, crisis intervention training, homeless rights and justice, the impact of cultural and historical trauma and the interplay of trauma, and addiction and mental health in the LGBTQ community.

Just as in years past, we packed a lot of powerful information into a few short hours, prompting such comments as:

“It broadened my scope of knowledge and the impact that mental health has on the world and community.”

“…appreciative of broad spectrum.”

“Fantastic content and quality presenters…”

The day was filled with inspirational moments, as when Sheriff Dart talked about the innovative ways in which he and his staff have managed to run the largest mental health facility in the country, even though his facility is the Cook County Jail, or when Dr. Salzer told the audience how community inclusion of people with psychiatric disabilities is not only possible, but is one of the best possible solutions for those who live with such disabilities. We were also inspired by Jesse Teverbaugh who shared his amazing journey from growing up the child of a father who was successful in his suicide attempt to living through depression and homelessness to ultimately transitioning from client to Director of Student and Alumni Affairs of the Cara Program, whose mission is to prepare and inspire motivated individuals to break the cycle of homelessness and poverty.

As we prepare for our 16th annual conference to take place on June 4, 2017, we are most particularly inspired by a comment from an attendee who simply said, “I learned how the community can help the mentally ill.”

And to the attendee who said, “I am eager for next year’s conference;” please know that we are just as eager to see you!

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Special thanks from Jill Randell our Conference Coordinator to those who attended our 15th Annual Conference

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June 2nd, 2016 Press Conference Event

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Press Conference Announcement

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Marilyn and Larry Cohens’ Interview on Fox 32 News at Noon on May 13th

We are glad to share that on May 13, 2016, Marilyn and Larry Cohen were interviewed on Fox News to discuss mental health statistics, stigma surrounding mental health, and to promote the 15th Annual Conference, “Mental Health: Why Does it Matter? A Compassionate Community Responds.” They did a wonderful job at increasing mental health awareness for the community!

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GALA

RSVP with Ruth McMahon via Ph: 773-383-4048 or email: rmcmahon@trilogyinc.org

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MarkPres

RSVP at our Eventbrite page!

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Breaking News!

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St. Nick

Reframing our Perception of grief: An introduction to traumatic loss and complicated grief.

Friday, March 11th, 2016 NRCI hosted a presentation and welcomed Grief therapist Jessica Hutchison, M.A. LCPC. She walked attendees through important definitions of grief that are commonly misused and explained in depth the difference between acute and integrated grief. Jessica highlighted the information that leads to common misconceptions of grief as well as emphasized the importance of considering culture when someone is working through the grief process, especially when diagnosing. She provided attendees with research based evidence and personal client experiences that could be used to challenge our current existing view of grief. Presenters left the presentation with a better understanding about trauma and how it affects grief. Make sure to follow NRCI for a part 2 to Jessica’s presentation!

Registration Grief PresentationGrief PresentationGrief Presentation Jessica

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Pope John XXIII School at Saint Nicholas Parish in Evanston, IL- Mental Health Education

On Saturday, January 23, 2016 about twelve parents of school aged children and adolescents gathered at Pope John XXIII School at Saint Nicholas Parish in Evanston, IL for a presentation in Spanish titled “How Discrimination and Racism Impact our Families and Community”.  The presenters were Dr. Gregory Benson-Flórez, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychology at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology along with Erika Garcia and Concepción Marín, graduate students also at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology.  The presenters informed the parents about various topics related to discrimination and racism.  One of the areas covered was how institutional racism and discrimination including anti-immigrant laws negatively impact Latino communities.  Another interesting topic was the explanation of how being victimized by racial microaggressions and covert forms of racism can lead to mental health problems.  The presenters provided the parents examples of how they can confront racism related stressors with the support of family, community and with the help of a mental health provider.

The second part of the presentation consisted of a free flowing animated discussion.  The parents asked many questions, especially regarding general mental health issues.  One father was interested in learning more about anxiety related mental health issues and stress management.  Many parents were concerned in obtaining more information about the etiology of diverse mental health issues in order to prevent them from occurring.  All of the parents in attendance mentioned having benefited by their participation and discussion of numerous mental health topics.  At the end of the presentation, the parents were given informational handouts.  The next presentation is scheduled for April, 2016.

Spanish Translation

Escuela Papa Juan XXIII de la Parroquia de San Nicolás en Evanston, IL-Educación de la Salud Mental

El pasado sábado 23 de Enero de 2016 unos doce padres de niños y adolescentes, se reunieron en la Escuela Papa Juan XXIII de la Parroquia de San Nicolás en Evanston, IL para escuchar una presentación titulada”Como la Discriminación y el Racismo Impacta Nuestras Familias y Nuestra Comunidad”.  Los presentadores fueron el Dr. Gregory Benson-Flórez, profesor del departamento de Psicología Clínica en la Escuela de Psicología Profesional de Chicago, Erika García y Concepción Marín, estudiantes graduadas en la misma escuela.  Los presentadores informaron a los padres de varios temas relacionados al racismo y la discriminación.  Una de los temas incluyo el racismo institucional y el impacto negativo de leyes anti-inmigratorias en nuestras comunidades.  Otro tema interesante fue le explicación de cómo las víctimas de las microagresiones y el racismo encubierto pueden llegar a causar problemas de salud mental. Los presentadores dieron ejemplos de cómo los padres pueden confrontar estos problemas relacionados al racismo con el apoyo de su familia, la comunidad,  y con la ayuda de un consejero de salud mental.

La segunda parte de la presentación se dio en forma de conversación para que los adultos pudieran participar y expresar sus ideas libremente.  Los adultos tuvieron numerosas preguntas sobre diversos aspectos de la salud mental.  Un padre estaba interesando en aprender más sobre los trastornos de ansiedad y sobre la reducción de estrés.  Varios padres estaban interesados en obtener más información sobre las causas de los trastornos mentales para poder prevenirlos.  Todos los padres mencionaron que beneficiaron de haber participado en la discusión sobre los temas presentados.  Al final de la presentación se repartieron folletos informativos.  La siguiente presentación se va a dar en Abril de 2016.

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LARRY AND MARILYN COHEN, EVANSTON RESIDENTS AND FOUNDERS OF THE NAOMI RUTH COHEN INSTITUTE FOR MENTAL HEALTH EDUCATION, HONORED AT NAACP ANNUAL BANQUET

(EVANSTON, IL) (DECEMBER 18, 2015) The Evanston/North Shore Branch of the NAACP honored Larry and Marilyn Cohen with its Community Service Award on November 21, 2015. Announced at the NAACP’s annual Freedom Fund Banquet, the Community Service Award was given to the Cohens in recognition of their work on behalf of the community through the organization they founded, the Naomi Ruth Cohen Institute for Mental Health Education (NRCI). NRCI’s goal is to overcome the stigma of mental illness, and in selecting the Cohens for the recognition, the NAACP noted their “commitment to mental health and the removal of stigmas, especially in underserved communities.” The Naomi Ruth Cohen Institute for Mental Health Education is a program at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology.

The Cohens were chosen based on merit in a process that includes committee nomination and selection. The event was held at the Evanston Golf Club.

The Naomi Ruth Cohen Institute was established by Larry and Marilyn Cohen in memory of their daughter Naomi.  NRCI’s goals include decreasing the stigma of mental illness by providing the public with a foundation for understanding mental health issues, recognizing signs and symptoms and knowing where to seek help.  Through partnerships with schools, community-based organizations, and religious congregations, NRCI raises awareness about the impact and consequences of mental health diagnoses on individual and community scales.

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Pope John XXIII School at Saint Nicholas Parish in Evanston, IL- Mental Health Education

      On Saturday, November 21, 2015 about twenty parents of school aged children and adolescents along with other interested adults gathered at Pope John XXIII School at Saint Nicholas Parish in Evanston, IL for a presentation in Spanish titled “Family Support during Latino Children’s Ethnic Identity Development”.  The presenters were Dr. Gregory Benson-Flórez, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychology at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology along with Erika Garcia, a Doctoral student also at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology.  The presenters created an open environment to allow for a free flowing discussion.  A therapeutic atmosphere was created to enhance the discussion of diverse topics. The importance of parental support to enhance their child’s ethnic identity development was a topic of interest.  The presenters also provided information regarding the various stages that Latinos in the U.S. typically encounter and progress through during their ethnic identity development.  Another interesting topic revealed how parents can instill ethnic pride in their children to maintain their culture of origin.

      The majority of the adults participated and shared their opinions resulting in an animated discussion.   A mother emphasized her responsibility to inform her children about the negative impact that discrimination can have on their identity development. Other adults mentioned the importance of continuing to education themselves in order to better educate and provide accurate information to their children.  At the end of the presentation there was a lively question and answer session.

Spanish Translation

Escuela Papa Juan XXIII de la Parroquia de San Nicolás en Evanston, IL-Educación de la Salud Mental

      El pasado sábado 21 de noviembre de 2015 unos veinte padres de niños y adolescentes, y  adultos interesados en el tema, se reunieron en la Escuela Papa Juan XXIII de la Parroquia de San Nicolás en Evanston, IL para escuchar una presentación titulada “El Apoyo Familiar Durante la Formación de la Identidad Étnica de Sus Hijos”. Los presentadores fueron el Dr. Gregory Benson-Flórez, profesor del departamento de Psicología Clínica en la Escuela de Psicología Profesional de Chicago y Erika García, estudiante de Doctorado en la misma escuela.  La presentación se dio en forma de conversación para que los adultos pudieran participar y expresar sus ideas libremente.  Los presentadores establecieron un ambiente de confianza para poder discutir diversos temas, por ejemplo la importancia de apoyar a los hijos para que puedan desarrollar una identidad étnica saludable.  Además, los presentadores dialogaron sobre las etapas de identidad por las cuales transitan la mayoría de los Latinos viviendo en los Estados Unidos durante su desarrollo de identidad étnica.  Otro tema de mucho interés incluyo la importancia de enseñar a los hijos de tener orgullo de sus raíces culturales y como poder conservarlas.

     La mayoría de los adultos participaron en la conversación y compartieron sus opiniones,  las cuales resultaron impactantes. Una madre mencionó su responsabilidad  de informar a sus hijos sobre como la discriminación puede tener un impacto negativo en el desarrollo de identidad.  Otros adultos expusieron la importancia de seguir aprendiendo y educándose para poder bien educar e informar a sus hijos. Al final de la presentación varios adultos participaron en una sesión de preguntas y respuestas muy animada. 

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Pope John XXIII School at Saint Nicholas Parish in Evanston, IL- Mental Health Education

On Saturday, October 17, 2015 about fifteen parents of school aged children and adolescents along with other interested adults gathered at Pope John XXIII School at Saint Nicholas Parish in Evanston, IL for a presentation in Spanish titled “Latino Families: The Impact of our Cultural Differences ”.  The presenters were Dr. Gregory Benson-Flórez, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychology at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology along with Erika Garcia and Concepción Marín, graduate students also at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology.  The presenters created an open environment to allow for a free flowing discussion.  Many interesting topics were part of the discussion.  The cultural diversity and heterogeneity among Latinos was one of them.  Most of the adults that formed part of the discussion were originally from Mexico and commented on the regional diversity within Mexico and how it is important to be mindful and respectful of these cultural differences.  One of the most important aspects of the discussion was to emphasize the importance of understanding the various viewpoints that family members may have in order to increase positive communication.  Another cultural value discussed was how the adults could instill in their children the important value of respecting their elders.

The adults present participated in an animated discussion and were especially interested in identifying ways to improve relationships with their children and how to relieve parental stress.  A mother highlighted the importance of daily physical exercise, which helps her not only physically but also emotionally and mentally.  Other adults mentioned finding spiritual activities to reduce stress.  A father stated that he planned on taking his family on a vacation outside of the city for a few days.  The discussion was also focused on helping parents support their children through ethnic socialization practices.  This was a popular topic as the parents were given a few tips on how to help their children attain a healthy ethnic identity.  At the end of the presentation there was a question and answer session and the adults were also given informational handouts.  The next presentation is scheduled for Saturday, November 21, 2015.

Escuela Papa Juan XXIII de la Parroquia de San Nicolás en Evanston, IL-Educación de la Salud Mental

El pasado sábado 17 de octubre de 2015 unos quince padres de niños y adolescentes, y  adultos interesados en el tema, se reunieron en la Escuela Papa Juan XXIII de la Parroquia de San Nicolás en Evanston, IL para escuchar una presentación titulada “Familias Latinas: El Impacto de Nuestras Diferencias Culturales”. Los presentadores fueron el Dr. Gregory Benson-Flórez, profesor del departamento de Psicología Clínica en la Escuela de Psicología Profesional de Chicago, Erika García y  Concepción Marín, estudiantes graduadas en la misma escuela.  La presentación se dio en forma de conversación para que los adultos pudieran participar y expresar sus ideas libremente.  Varios temas interesantes formaron parte de la discusión, por ejemplo la diversidad  cultural entre los diferentes países latinoamericanos.  La mayoría de los adultos que formaron parte de la presentación eran de origen mexicano así que algunos de ellos  mencionaron las grandes diferencias regionales dentro de México y la importancia de entender y respetar estas diferencias regionales.  Uno de los aspectos más importantes de la discusión fue  señalar la importancia de entender los diversos puntos de vista entre miembros de la familia para tener un buen nivel de comunicación. También se subrayó la importancia para los menores de  mantener el respeto por los mayores.

Los adultos participaron en la conversación de una manera muy animada.  Ellos estaban interesados en saber cómo pueden llevarse bien con sus hijos y también reducir los niveles de estrés que sienten como padres.  Una madre mencionó la importancia de hacer algún tipo de ejercicio físico todos los días para mantenerse bien emocionalmente, además de recibir los beneficios físicos.  Otros adultos sugirieron buscar actividades para sentirse bien espiritualmente.  Un padre mencionó la idea de tomar unos días de vacaciones con su familia y salirse de la cuidad por unos días.  Igualmente importante fue hablar sobre cómo apoyar a sus hijos durante el proceso de socialización.  Esto fue un tema de mucho interés y los presentadores dieron unos consejos para que los hijos puedan desarrollar una identidad étnica fuerte.  Al final de la presentación varios adultos participaron en la sesión  de preguntas y respuestas y se repartieron folletos informativos.    La siguiente presentación se va a dar el 21 de noviembre de 2015.

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Pilot Study: Evanston African American Youth Programming

NRCI has partnered with Mayor Tisdahl ’s Summer Youth Employment Program to conduct a pilot study with up to 100 African American high school students participating in mental health education programming during July 2015. Program developers from NRCI will train 12 young adults to lead mental health education programming to youth in the topics of Conflict Resolution, Communication, Healthy Peer Relationships, and Stress Management.

The pilot study will be evaluated and results will determine a recommendation for expanding this partnership for mental health education programming during the 2015-2016 school year and for summer 2016 through Mayor Tisdahl’s office.

Stay tuned for more on this initiative!

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THE NAOMI RUTH COHEN INSTITUTE AT THE CHICAGO SCHOOL RECEIVES $7,500 GRANT FROM THE EVANSTON COMMUNITY FOUNDATION

(CHICAGO) (June 25, 2015) —The Naomi Ruth Cohen Institute for Mental Health Education (NRCI) at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology today announced that the Evanston Community Foundation has awarded the organization a $7,500 grant. The responsive grant, one of many awarded to 29 agencies seeking to address the challenges in Evanston, will be used for mental health education programming NRCI is developing for students at Evanston Township High School (ETHS).

“The Evanston Community Foundation is known for awarding grants to some of the most forward-thinking, effective organizations in the area, and we’re honored to join their ranks,” said Lynessa Rico, NRCI’s director. “The grant will be used for our efforts at Evanston Township High School where under the supervision of The Chicago School’s faculty, graduate students from The Chicago School will create toolkits and train ETHS students as facilitators in conducting youth-led, anti-stigma mental health programming.”

The toolkits will be evidence-based, age-appropriate and culturally relevant.  Standardized facilitator training will also be created to ensure uniformity in presentation. Eight ETHS students will be trained as facilitators. The grant will be administered through the ECF’s David Mulder Memorial Fund for Mental Health.

The Naomi Ruth Cohen Institute was established by Larry and Marilyn Cohen in memory of their daughter Naomi.  NRCI’s goals include decreasing the stigma of mental illness by providing the public with a foundation for understanding mental health issues, recognizing signs and symptoms and knowing where to seek help.  Through partnerships with schools, community-based organizations, and religious congregations, NRCI raises awareness about the impact and consequences of mental health diagnoses on individual and community scales.

The Evanston Community Foundation helps Evanston thrive now and forever as a vibrant, inclusive, and just community. It builds, connects and distributes resources and knowledge through local organizations for the common good. The Foundation builds endowments for current and future opportunities, fosters private philanthropy, focuses the impact of collective giving, finds solutions to community challenges, allocates grants, and provides leadership training.

About The Chicago School of Professional Psychology

Founded in 1979, The Chicago School of Professional Psychology (TCSPP) is a nonprofit, private university devoted exclusively to psychology, and related behavioral and health sciences. The university serves nearly 4,500 students across campuses in Chicago; Southern California (Los Angeles and Irvine); and Washington, D.C., as well as through online programs. The Chicago School is accredited by the WASC Senior College and University Commission, (WSCUC), and its Clinical Psychology Doctoral Program in Chicago is accredited by the American Psychological Association. A member of the National Council of Schools and Programs of Professional Psychology, TCSPP is recognized for its distinguished service and outstanding contributions to cultural diversity and advocacy. The community service initiatives on the Chicago Campus have also earned recognition on the President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll for seven consecutive years. The Los Angeles Campus gained its second recognition in 2014, and the Washington, D.C. Campus received its first award in 2014. With more than 20 graduate degree programs, thousands of hours of real-world training, and a wealth of international opportunities, TCSPP is the leader in professional psychology education. To learn more, visit www.thechicagoschool.edu.

MEDIA CONTACT: Lisa Riley, 312.410.8963, lriley@thechicagoschool.edu


Pope John XXIII School at Saint Nicholas Parish in Evanston, IL- Mental Health Education

On Saturday April 11, 2015 about fifteen parents of school aged children and adolescents gathered at Pope John XXIII School at Saint Nicholas Parish in Evanston, IL for a presentation in Spanish titled “The Effects from the Process of Adaption in Our Families and Communities”.  The presenters were Dr. Gregory Benson-Flórez, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychology at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology and Concepción Marín, Masters student of Counseling also at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology.  The presenters created an open environment to facilitate discussion with and among the parents.   Many aspects of the acculturation process were included such as the various stages of acculturation and the importance of ethnic identity.  Psychosocial factors that influence the acculturation process including language, the immigration process, discrimination and racism were part of the discussion.

Perhaps the most intriguing topics discussed included the importance of preserving the Latino culture and the differing levels of acculturation among family members.  A father mentioned how he and his wife make efforts to instill important Latino values in their children but find it challenging since they are not able to visit family members that live outside of the U.S.  Other parents mentioned the importance of speaking Spanish in their home and also maintaining contact with family in Latin America through phone communication in order to increase their children’s level of ethnic identity.  In addition, the presenters emphasized the importance of having family members empathize with their diverse acculturation experiences and differences to improve the communication among the parents and their children.  The presentation concluded with a high level of participation by the parents in a question and answer session.

Escuela Papa Juan XXIII de la Parroquia de San Nicolás en Evanston, IL-Educación de la Salud Mental

El pasado sábado 11 de abril de 2015, unos quince padres de niños y adolescentes, algunos de ellos acompañados por sus hijos, se reunieron en la Escuela Papa Juan XXIII de la Parroquia de San Nicolás en Evanston, IL para escuchar una presentación titulada “Los Efectos de Procesos de Adaptación en Nuestras Familias y Comunidades”. Los presentadores fueron el Dr. Gregory Benson-Flórez, profesor del departamento de Psicología Clínica en la Escuela de Psicología Profesional de Chicago y Concepción Marín, estudiante de maestría en consejería en la misma escuela.  La presentación se dio en forma de conversación, lo cual permitió a los padres expresar libremente sus experiencias sobre los temas.  Varios aspectos de la aculturación fueron tema de la conversación, por ejemplo las diferentes etapas de aculturación y la importancia de la identidad étnica.  Los factores psicosociales que afectan la aculturación como el idioma, el proceso de inmigración, la discriminación y el racismo también forman parte de la discusión.

Algunos temas de mucho interés fueron la importancia de mantener la cultura latina y los diferentes niveles de aculturación entre los miembros de la familia.  Un padre menciono que intentan enseñar a sus hijos los aspectos importantes de la cultura latina pero les queda difícil porque  no pueden  visitar a sus familiares que viven fuera de los Estados Unidos.   Otros padres señalaron la importancia de hablar español en el hogar y mantener el contacto por teléfono con familiares que viven en Latinoamérica para aumentar el nivel de identidad étnica de sus hijos.   Igualmente importante fue hablar de diferencias entre miembros de la familia con respecto al grado de aculturación.   Los presentadores hicieron notar la importancia de poder demostrar empatía y hablar de estas diferencias para mejor la comunicación entre los padres e hijos.  Al final de la presentación varios padres participaron en la sesión  de preguntas y respuestas.

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Self-Care for Clinicians:
Who helps you when you’re helping everyone else? 

On February 9, Dr. Cheryl Magrini of the Depression Bipolar Support Alliance (DBSA – Loop Chapter) led an engaging discussion on self-care for future clinicians at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology.  She shared many insightful ideas and resources, and she has offered to share the information that she used during her presentation.  Please click on the following to see Dr. Cheryl Magrini’s:

discussion notes: Discussion on Self-Care
self-care assessment: Kaleidoscope Self Care Self Assessment
resources on self-care: Resources on Self-Care
clinicians’ tips: How do clinicians care for themselves?

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Pope John XXIII School at Saint Nicholas Parish in Evanston, IL- Mental Health Education

El Sábado 31 de enero del 2015 alrededor de quince padres de niños de edad escolar, quienes algunos de ellos fueron acompañados por sus hijos, se reunieron en la escuela Papa Juan XXIII de la Parroquial de San Nicolás en Evanston, Il para una presentación titulada “Estrategias de Prevención para el abuso de alcohol en la comunidad Latina”.  Los presentadores fueron el Dr. Gregory Benson-Flórez profesor en el departamento de Psicología Clínica en la Escuela de Psicología Profesional de Chicago y Jacob Gross estudiante de maestría en consejería clínica en la misma escuela. Teniendo como finalidad de crear un ambiente de confianza, la presentación se dio de tipo conversación, lo cual permitió a los padres expresar libremente sus experiencias acerca del abuso de alcohol y como esto ha afectado a los demás integrantes de la familia.  El tema de mayor interés para los padres fue el abuso de alcohol en las celebraciones y festejos familiares.  Otros temas de conversación fueron como entender las etapas de cambio y los comportamientos que forman parte del tratamiento del abuso de alcohol.  Los padres expresaron la importancia de buscar la manera de motivarse para poder confrontar la fase de negación y superar el abuso de alcohol.  Al final de la presentación, hubo una sesión de preguntas y respuestas donde además se otorgaron información de los recursos disponibles para la comunidad.

On Saturday January 31, 2015 parents of school aged children and adolescents met at Pope John XXIII School at Saint Nicholas Parish in Evanston, Il for a Spanish speaking presentation on “ Alcohol Abuse: Prevention and Strategies in our Latino Community”. The presenters included Dr. Gregory Benson-Flórez, an Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychology at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology, and Jacob Gross, a Masters student of Clinical Counseling also at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology.  The parents participated in dialogue regarding their diverse experiences related to alcohol abuse. In addition, the parents discussed the importance of finding motivating factors to overcome the denial of an alcohol abuse problem.  Various aspects of alcohol abuse in the Latino community were covered, including how these problems may occur at family gatherings and celebrations.  Other topics included information on how individuals that are seeking treatment for alcohol abuse and related problems may progress through the stages of change model.    The presentation concluded with a question and answer session and the distribution of community resources available in the Latino community.

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2015 Conference Sponsor FAMILY ACTION NETWORK is hosting a screening of “The Internet’s Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz” on January 25th at New Trier High School.  For more information, please visit FAN’s website.

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SAVE THE DATE!

We are pleased to announce our 14th Annual Community Mental Health Conference for 2015. This year’s conference theme is:

Understanding and Overcoming the Stigma of Mental Illness.”

The conference will be held on Sunday, June 7, 2015 from 9:30 am – 3:15 pm
at Beth Emet The Free Synagogue in Evanston Illinois.

U.S. Congresswoman Jan Schakowsky (IL- 9) will open the conference. She will be joined on the dais by Dr. Patrick Corrigan, a well-published and researched expert on stigma and mental illness. Dr. Corrigan is a Distinguished Professor of Psychology at the Illinois Institute of Technology. He is a licensed clinical psychologist who has developed and provided services for people with serious mental illnesses and their families for more than 30 years. Dr. Corrigan writes, “Stigma is not just erasing the prejudice of discrimination of mental illness; it is promoting attitudes and behavior that reflect recovery and self- determination.”

Our opening plenary will also include a panel of three “persons in recovery” who will relate their experiences, and discuss how they speak out to help others:

  • Reverend Dr. Cheryl Magrini, National Chair, Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance. She embraces resiliency while living with bipolar disorder;
  • Chris Prochut, former Bolingbrook Police Commissioner and partner of Drew Peterson.  He is an advocate and a law enforcement and first responder suicide prevention trainer.
  • Greg Baugues, software developer with ADHD and bipolar disorder. He speaks regularly to de-stigmatize mental illness in the tech community.

The moderator for this conference will be Michael Horowitz, Ph.D., President of TCS Education System.

If you have any questions, please feel free to call the NRCI office at 312.410.8967.

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QUARTER 1 2014 NEWSLETTER NOW AVAILABLE!

Click here to read it!

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Pope John XXIII School at Saint Nicholas: November 15 Session

Saint Nicholas Parish: Mental Health Education

On Saturday November 15, 2014 approximately twenty parents of school aged children and adolescents gathered at Pope John XXIII School at Saint Nicholas Parish in Evanston, IL for a presentation in Spanish titled “Prevention of Abuse and Intimidation From Bullies in Our Schools”.  The presenters were Dr. Gregory Benson-Flórez, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychology at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology, and Concepción Marin, Masters student of Counseling, also at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology.  The presentation focused on various aspects of school bullying including the types, characteristics, and the social context in which bullying typically occurs.  Other topics included the psychological impact and long term problems associated with bullying such as academic, social, and emotional issues.  Perhaps the most interesting and useful topic for the parents was how to prevent bullying using various interventions and treatment plans, such as learning strategies to improve their children’s self-esteem and accessing counseling services as well as school and community resources.  The presentation concluded with a lively question and answer session.

The degree of participation and enthusiasm demonstrated by the parents revealed a high level of interest in mental health issues impacting their Latino community.  One of the mothers mentioned the importance of positive communication with her children and the rejection at home of any form of discrimination that can be an aspect of bullying.  A father stated the importance of being a good role model for his children and not allowing bullying to take place in the home.  Other parents talked about how to acknowledge their children’s positive characteristics and behavior and to become more involved in their schools.  In general, it appeared that the parents left the presentation with an elevated sense of optimism and increased information to help prevent school bullying.

En Español

El sábado 15 de noviembre de 2014 aproximadamente veinte padres de familia de niños de edad escolar se reunieron en la escuela Papa Juan XXIII de la Parroquia de San Nicolás en Evanston, IL para escuchar una presentación titulada “Prevención del Abuso e Intimidación de los Bullies en Nuestras Escuelas”.  Los presentadores fueron el Dr. Gregory Benson-Flórez, profesor del departamento de Psicología Clínica en la Escuela de Psicología Profesional de Chicago y Concepción Marin, estudiante de maestría en consejería en la misma escuela. La presentación se enfocó en varios aspectos del bullying, por ejemplo los tipos y características de hostigamiento, el contexto social donde ocurre la agresión, y el acoso cibernético.  Otros temas presentados fueron  los efectos psicológicos y negativos del bullying, tales como los problemas académicos, sociales y emocionales.  El tema de mayor interés  para los padres fue cómo prevenir el bullying mediante diversas intervenciones, por ejemplo varias herramientas para mejorar el auto estima de los niños y adolescentes y comó buscar la ayuda de la consejería y el apoyo en la escuela, lo mismo que en la comunidad.  Al final de la presentación hubo una animada sesión de preguntas y respuestas.

La mayoría de los padres participaron con mucho entusiasmo demostrando un alto interés por la salud mental en la comunidad Latina.  Una madre mencionó la importancia de  la comunicación positiva con sus hijos en su hogar y de no tolerar ningún tipo de discriminación que pueda ser un aspecto del bullying. Un padre señaló la importancia de dar buen ejemplo y no dejar que el bullying ocurra en su casa. Otros mencionaron la importancia de reconocer y respaldar el comportamiento positivo de sus hijos y de tener más contacto en las escuelas.  Por lo general, parece que los padres  salieron contentos de la presentación por haber recibido información útil para prevenir la agresión de los bullies.

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Pope John XXIII School at Saint Nicholas: October 18 Session

ENGLISH

On Saturday, October 18th, 2014, Latino parents of school-aged children gathered at Pope John XXIII School at Saint Nicholas Parish, for a special program in Spanish led by a mental health professional. Four of the parents present attended last year’s program, and the general opinion among those who had previously attended was that they had found the program both enjoyable and informative. Topics in this year’s program included parenting styles and positive parenting, improving communication, and identifying signs of mental illness. “The fact that we had a high return rate speaks to the importance and need for the dissemination of vital mental health information and education that our Latino community seeks” said Sergio Hernández, M.A., LPC who led the program for the second year in a row.

The format of the gathering was left open in order to facilitate the flow between the topics, which were underlined by the struggles many parents found about making themselves available to their children, and balancing their different parenting styles. The parents agreed that their children could benefit from more family time, yet allowing them to “be children” within a democratic, and supportive environment. The meeting was ended with a Q&A where a mother pleaded with intact families, on the importance of respect and understanding for children from single parent households. Her comment resonated with the rest of the parents who felt that by teaching their children about respect, they would be more sensitive to accepting the differences of others.

SPANISH

El sábado 18 de octubre del 2014, padres de niños en edad escolar se reunieron en la Parroquia Papa Juan XXIII de la Escuela Parroquial de San Nicolás, para un programa especial en español dirigido por un profesional de salud mental. Cuatro de los padres presentes habían asistido el programa el año anterior. La opinión general entre los que habían asistido previamente era que habían encontrado el programa agradable e informativo. Los temas en el programa de este año incluyeron los estilos de crianza y la crianza positiva, la mejora de la comunicación, y la identificación de señales o síntomas de enfermedades de salud mental. “El hecho de que tuvimos una alta tasa de padres que regresaron  este año habla de la importancia y necesidad de la difusión de información vital concerniente a la salud mental, y la educación que nuestra comunidad latina busca”, dijo Sergio Hernández , M.A. , LPC que dirigió el programa por su segundo año consecutivo .

El formato de la reunión fue abierta con el fin de facilitar el flujo entre los temas, que fueron subrayadas por las luchas que muchos padres encuentran al hacerse disponibles a sus hijos, y el equilibrio de sus diferentes estilos de crianza. Los padres estuvieron de acuerdo en que sus hijos podrían beneficiarse de más tiempo familiar, pero también proveyendo el tiempo que les permita a sus hijos e hijas “ser niños ” dentro de un ambiente democrático y con apoyo. La reunión terminó con una sección de pregunta y respuesta, donde una madre suplicó a las familias intactas, sobre la importancia del respeto y la comprensión por los niños de hogares de padres solteros. Su comentario resonó con el resto de los padres que acordaron que al enseñar a sus hijos más sobre el respeto, los haría más sensibles para aceptar las diferencias de los demás.

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Upcoming programs at The Chicago School

On November 12 (Wednesday), Dr. Cheryl Magrini of the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance will be on hand to lead a discussion on the Stigma of Being Crazy and the implications of the word “crazy” on how we view and treat mental illness.  This discussion will take place in Room 515 at 12pm.  The GoTo Meeting info is as follows:

https://www3.gotomeeting.com/join/649503990

United States: +1 (626) 521-0017

United States (toll-free): 1 877 309 2070

Access Code: 649-503-990

Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting

Meeting ID: 649-503-990

On October 28 (Tuesday), Diana Watkins will conduct a presentation on the Stigma of Domestic Violence.  Diana has worked with domestic abuse victims for years and has a wealth of knowledge and experience to share.  Her presentation will take place in Room 323 at 12pm.  The GoTo Meeting info is as follows:

https://www3.gotomeeting.com/join/725791630

United States: +1 (213) 493-0015

United States (toll-free): 1 866 899 4679

Access Code: 725-791-630

Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting

Meeting ID: 725-791-630

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Great read for World Mental Health Day!

“Research out this week shows that attitudes have indeed significantly improved in the last few years, but that stigma is still widespread. Nine of ten people with mental health problems say this has had a negative impact on their lives.”

#worldmentalhealthday

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OUT OF THE DARKNESS WALK 2014 – NRCI AND MACP COUNCIL RAISE NEARLY $4,500!
TCSPP DC TEAM RAISES $4,300 – third largest group for DC Walk!

This past Saturday (September 20), NRCI, with The Chicago School’s MACP Council, walked in support for suicide prevention efforts during the Out of the Darkness Community Walk, hosted by the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.  This national program has people from all walks of life participate in a day of solidarity, support, remembrance, and fundraising, and it is with great pleasure that we were a part of the LARGEST OUT OF THE DARKNESS WALK EVER.

Thank you to everyone who joined our team and/or donated!  Our goal was to raise $2,000, and we more than doubled that! Your support is greatly appreciated.

In addition, the Washington, DC Out of the Darkness Walk also took place this past weekend, and The Chicago School’s team from the DC Campus raised $4,300 and they were recognized as the third largest fundraising team during the walk!

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MESSAGE FROM NAMI and Nancy Sussman:

AS YOU MAY KNOW MUCH OF MY TIME AND ENERGY OF THE PAST YEARS HAS GONE INTO DIRECTING THE PROGRAMS FOR THE NATIONAL ALLIANCE ON MENTAL ILLNESS IN THE COOK COUNTY NORTH  SUBURBAN AFFILIATE (NAMI CCNS).

OUR ANNUAL WALK IS APPROACHING AND WILL TAKE PLACE ON SATURDAY OCTOBER 18TH AT 10AM.  PLEASE CLICK ON THE LINK BELOW FOR MORE INFORMATION TO WALK, DONATE OR MOST IMPORTANT LEARN  ABOUT THIS IMPORTANT CAUSE.  THE PROGRAMS OF NAMI HAVE AND CONTINUE TO HELP SO MANY FAMILIES AND INDIVIDUALS WITH THE CHALLENGES OF MENTAL ILLNESS…… IMPROVING THEIR QUALITY OF LIFE WITH  OUR EDUCATION, SUPPORT AND ADVOCACY.

 http://namiwalks.nami.org/TeamGreatPrograms2014

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Fall 2014 Updates from NRCI
Summer into Fall

Lutheran Social Services, Girls in the Game, and GirlForward: NRCI’s program developers had a busy summer, as they provided mental health education programs to three different organizations during their summer break.  The workshops covered a variety of topics, including health-self-image, bullying, and positive communications.

September is Suicide Prevention Awareness Month: NRCI is hosting a series of programs at The Chicago School all month to promote suicide prevention.  On September 9, Andy and Julianne Weiss were on hand to have a candid discussion with students and staff about military and veteran suicide, and on September 18, TCSPP’s Dr. Nancy Zarse led a discussion on the aftermath of suicide.

 

 

 

 

NRCI is heading up a team for this year’s Out of the Darkness Walk, which raises funds and awareness for suicide prevention.  The walk is THIS SATURDAY (September 20) in Grant Park. If you want to join our team and/or donate, please click here.

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June 1st Conference – SUICIDE: Responding and Creating Hope a Huge Success
Struggle against suicide hard but progress seen with candor, less stigma

Suicide is a stubborn illness. But a growing willingness to talk about it, seeking help without shame, and more programs to help suicide victims and their families is expected one day to drive down the number who take their own lives, said keynote speakers at the 13th annual Naomi Ruth Cohen community conference aimed at reducing the stigma of mental health problems.

For every 100,000 U.S. citizens, 12.4 committed suicide in 2010, down just slightly from the 12.5 who did in 1990, noted David Clark, Ph.D., a member of the International Academy for Suicide Research. “With so much stigma around suicide, it’s important to get solid information out and have people talk about it. Our grandparents never talked about suicide, but signs of more public discussion like this conference subtracts a little bit of stigma.”

Heidi Bryan is a suicide attempt survivor doing more than her share to keep the issue, however uncomfortable, in the public eye. She travels the country with a message for everyone enduring suicidal thoughts. “There is help. There is hope.” For her, the realization she wouldn’t kill herself finally came in 1995 when her brother committed suicide.

“What must his family, his wife, his kids, his co-workers, his friends have thought? Did he really believe we’d all be better off without him? I knew right then he and I had mental illness, and for me, suicide was no longer a strategy.” She said suicidal impulses still occur, “but I can just let them go now. They’re no longer a real threat.” Bryan serves on the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention and wrote a book about her life-long struggles entitled, “Must be the Witches in the Mountains.”

Catholic priest Charles T. Rubey founded Loving Outreach to Survivors of Suicide 35 years ago. He said the notion that people who kill themselves are somehow “cowards or sissies” must be discarded. “In truth, if they had any other way of coping with life, they would. Suicide is really an act of desperation, not cowardice. They just can’t go on. Pain absolutely engulfs them. But there is help. Life is bearable. We have to spread this word, particularly among our adolescents.”

Cheryl King, Ph.D., director of the Youth Depression and Suicide Research Program at the University of Michigan, told the hundreds of attendees, “Suicide prevention takes constant messages of hope and lifelong strategies with a special focus on the young.” She likened humans struggling with challenges to plants. “They’re not all equally strong. So we water them, support them, nudge them however we can.

“Just that little bit of help can be enough over time to allow plants to flourish and grow strong,” she said. “That’s the same way mental illnesses tied to suicide can help reduce suicide numbers.” She noted young suicide victims often use alcohol and drugs to ease their pain. “But these are depressants and only make their problems worse. So adults in every setting – home, school, work – have to look for and recognize these co-morbid conditions and intervene on our youngsters’ behalf.”

The Program was attended by over 250 and the responses have been overwhelming.

Next year’s conference will be held on Sunday, Jun e7th, and the subject will be STIGMA.
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African-American Community Must Confront Suicide Reality
Program Write-Up

EVANSTON, Ill., May 20, 2014 – Suicide occurs regularly among African-Americans but its culture historically won’t face it in a meaningful way. African-American males in particular view any mental health challenges – not only suicide – as unmanly and typically dismiss them out of hand.

But it’s high time this changes, said those leading the May 15 town forum on “Suicide and the African-American Community” at the Second Baptist Church, 1717 Benson Ave. in Evanston. Dozens of people turned out to tackle the difficult topic.

Suicide claims 38,000 Americans every year – more than die in car accidents or homicides. The National Institute of Mental Health reports 90 percent of suicides are tied to some form of mental illness.

Church Pastor Mark Dennis helps guide many church members through immediate suicide threats. When the crisis passes, he said, “I get them in touch with qualified mental health professionals who take it from there. Not all answers to our problems can be found only in the church.” Moreover, Pastor Dennis himself has used mental health counselors on occasion.

One mental health professional is Dr. Jacquelin Anderson, Ph.D., of Northeastern Illinois and Loyola universities. Her mother killed herself years ago. Dr. Anderson had always found it hard to talk about it. “However, I am telling that full story now. This is what we all must do – remove the shame and stigma surrounding suicide by talking about it openly and honestly.”

Only then, she said, can real progress begin to find ways to prevent suicide.

Evanston Mayor Elizabeth Tisdahl told the group she thought the city has all the health programs citizens require. “But when I asked an aide for a list of entities dealing with suicide, I found the answer is really painful to admit. There are none. So I have a challenge to change that for our citizens and will work hard to do that.”

Dr. Reginald Richardson, Ph.D., is Vice President for Evaluation and Clinical Services at Northwestern University’s Family Institute. He said turning the tide toward African-American awareness of suicide and meeting suicide’s challenges is an “erosion, not an explosion. It will take time, and we must persevere.”

The conference was put on by the Naomi Ruth Cohen Institute at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology. The NRCI can be reached at 312-467-2552 or nrcinstitute@thechicagoschool.edu.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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“The Definition of Insanity” – Wall Street Journal article

The WSJ Online featured an opinion piece on mental illness in their April 1, 2014 issue, focusing on the inadequacies of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.  Please click here to read it.

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Suicide and the African-American Community Conference – click here for more information.

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Domestic Violence Workshop at Pope John XXIII

The workshop on domestic violence focused on education around the nature and consequences of this type of abuse on women, children, and communities. As a group, some of the myths pertaining to domestic violence were addressed, and there was active discussion among the group about what the community can do to educate and empower victims of domestic violence in an attempt to eradicate this problem.

El taller sobre violencia doméstica enfocaba en educación acerca de la naturaleza y consecuencias de este tipo de abuso en mujeres, niños, y comunidades. Como un grupo, discutimos algunos de los mitos acerca de la violencia doméstica, y hubo discusión activa sobre lo que la comunidad puede hacer para educar y autorizar a las víctimas de violencia doméstica para tratar de combatir este problema.

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Registration is now open for the 2014 Conference – click here to register! 

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The Student Association for Military Mental Health (SAMMH) at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology will be hosting a seminar entitled “Serving Military Veterans: Understanding Their Experiences & Clinical Implications” on April 11 at The Chicago School.  This great presentation, co-sponsored by NRCI, will include a plethora of information from Dr. John Mundt of the Jesse Brown VA and will be offering CEUs for attendance. For more information, please click here: SAMMH seminar flier for website.

If you’d like to register, please click here.

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Please click here for an article from the Institute of Medicine  of the National Academies on the mental health of US military and veterans: MilitaryMentalHealth_findings.

Thanks to the Student Association for Military Mental Health (SAMMH) at The Chicago School for sharing!

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Girls in the Game: Leader to Leader Program

NRCI and The Chicago School co-hosted the Girls in the Game Leader to Leader Panel, in which female high school students from all around the Chicagoland area led a discussion with female leaders within The Chicago School community:

Chicago Campus President – Dr. Patricia Arredondo
NRCI and Community Partnerships Director – Ms. Jill Glenn
Career Services Director – Ms. Aisha Ghori
Admissions Counselor – Ms. Tabitha Nichols
Business/IO Faculty – Dr. Connie Fuller

This insightful and lively discussion allowed the girls to learn about the field of psychology, issues about mental health, and what it takes to be an effective leader.

Click here for Girls in the Games’ writeup on this program: Leader to Leader Interview-The Chicago School Recap

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Great Program at St. Nick’s this month!

Patricia Voloschin-Weiner spoke about the emotional impact of family separation due to voluntary or forced immigration. Approximately 30 parents participated on a dialogue regarding personal; experiences, concerns, and overall impressions on the topic following a presentation by Mrs. Voloschin-Weiner. The need for  individuals to take an active role in the political process which is currently discussing immigration reform was discussed.

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La sra. Patricia Voloschin-Weiner hablo sobre el impacto emocional surguiente de la separacion familiar debido a imigracion voluntaria or forzada. Aproximadamente 30 padres asistieron a esta charla y participaron con preguntas, comentarios, y compartiendo sus experiencias despues de haber escuchado una presentacion sobre este tema. La importancia de participar activamente en el mproceso politico actual sobre la reforma imigratoria fue estresado

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Upcoming Outreach

NRCI has been teaming up with a variety of partner organizations to bring mental health education programming to diverse populations, and we are proud to announce that our program developers will be providing programs/workshops with the following in 2014:

Girls in the Game – NRCI will host the Teen Institute Day to be held at TCSPP that will include workshops focusing on a variety of topics relevant to teenage girls

Global Citizenship Experience High School – NRCI will hold monthly workshops with the students at this unique and innovative high school, focusing on issues such as bullying and suicide prevention

Lutheran Social Services – NRCI will continue its partnership with Lutheran Social Services and do presentations on self-care and codependency

Indo-American Center – NRCI will conduct a pilot program with immigrant children on bullying and acculturation

Belding Elementary School – NRCI program developers will conduct a one-day workshop for 7th and 8th graders on self-harm

Stay tuned for more updates on other partners and projects!

If you or your organization is interested in having NRCI conduct presentations/workshops, please contact us at NRCInstitutes@thechicagoschool.edu or at 312.467.2168.

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November 9 at St. Nick’s in Evanston write-ups

On Saturday, November 9th – parents of K-8th grade school children participated in a training on Bullying at St. Nicholas Catholic Church in Evanston Hector A. Hernández, M.A. Parents discussed information on bullying and what to do when children are being bullied at school.  Parents also discussed cultural barriers to reporting bullying to school staff. Parents learned, and practiced strategies to help their children emotionally and resources to prevent and stop bullying. They also discussed positive tips to healthy and open communication with children and adolescents.  During workshop families also discussed signs of bullying and active approaches to end bullying, such as participating in school activities and communicating with school staff.

El Sábado 9 de Noviembre, los padres de la comunidad de Evanston se reunieron en St. Nicholas Catholic Church para una presentación impartida por Hector A. Hernandez, MA. Esta presentación dio información a los padres acerca de “bullying” y que se debe hacer cuando  sus hijos están siendo maltratados  por compañeros en la escuela. Los padres también aprendieron estrategias para ayudar a sus hijos. Los padres discutieron diferentes recursos que ayudan a parar  el maltrato hecho por otros niños, como hablar con los trabajadores sociales y maestros. Las familias también hablaron de  la importancia de la comunicación con los niños y adolescentes.  Los padres recibieron información acerca de señales que los niños muestran cuando están teniendo problemas en la escuela y la importancia de la comunicación para asegurar que los adolecentes y los niños se sientan bien en la escuela.

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Programs at St. Nick’s in Evanston: update on October and information for TOMORROW

On Saturday, October 12th, mothers of school children in Evanston attended a discussion led by Sergio Hernandez, M.A. of PEER Services, on speaking to their children about grief and loss after a death.  Aside from coping skills, the parents also learned about general healthy communication with their children. The parents were quick to point out both the benefits and disadvantages in the use of modern technology in their children’s lives. Many felt that their children, given school and social pressures, were losing their sense of connection to family living. The parents were left with much needed information and resources. They were given tips which included the drafting of contracts that both, parents and children needed to abide by; scheduling family meetings in the form of outings, meals, and bonding experiences; letting children experience their own consequences, and learning from disappointments. Parents conjointly agreed that parenting as a single unit was difficult and wished their male counterparts collaborated in putting into action a more viable plan for raising their children.

Tomorrow (November 9): Hector Hernandez M.A. will lead a session on Bullying. The purpose of this presentation is to provide parents with information about bullying and what to do when children are bullied at school. Parent will learn strategies to help their children emotionally and give them resources to prevent and stop Bullying. The importance is to ensure that children and adolescents are feeling safe at school. Please note: all programs are in Spanish…please feel free to ask any questions. 312-467-2552.

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NRCI/TCS Team at this year’s Out of the Darkness Walk

October 28 2013 — This past Saturday (October 26), NRCI and TCS brought a team of walkers to the Out of the Darkness Walk, hosted by the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.  This great event, designed to raise awareness and funds for suicide prevention education, research, and advocacy, garnered over 3,000 participants from the Chicagoland area alone and raised over $555,000.00.

For our part, we had 28 participants for our first time joining this walk and creating a team.  On top of that, we were able to surpass our initial team fundraising goal of $1,000.00!  By Saturday, our team had raised $2,610.00 for the walk.

We’d like to thank all those that supported us in this endeavor, including TCSPP faculty and staff, who donated through our “jeans day Wednesday” last week!

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Write-ups for October 12’s Program at St. Nick’s/Pope John PXXIII

 Please see below for information (both in English and in Spanish) about this past weekend’s (October 12) program:

ENG

On Saturday, October 12th, 2013 – parents, all mothers of K-8th grade school children, met at St. Nicholas Catholic church in Evanston for an open panel discussion led by Sergio D. Hernández, M.A. and facilitated by 3 other mental health specialists. The initial topic of the discussion, given the circumstances surrounding the loss of an important figure within the parish, focused on talking to children about grief and loss. The overarching purpose of the meeting, however, was to help parents improve communication with their children regarding a variety of subjects. The parents were quick to point out both the benefits and disadvantages in the use of modern technology in their children’s lives. Many felt that their children, given school and social pressures, were losing their sense of connection to family living. One parent in particular voiced her frustrations because she felt her sense of responsibility was to provide her children with the tools to succeed, but was taken aback by the toll it was taking on her family.

The parents were left with much needed information and resources. They were given tips which included the drafting of contracts that both parents and children needed to abide by: scheduling family meetings in the form of outings, meals, and bonding experiences, letting children experience their own consequences, and learning from disappointments. The mothers unanimously agreed that parenting as a single unit was difficult and wished their male counterparts collaborated in putting into action a more viable plan for raising their children. Lastly, the parents wished for more meetings where useful information could be disseminated and found their time to be enjoyable, informative, and extremely productive while they waited for their children to be dismissed from Saturday school!

ESP

El sábado, 12 de Octubre del 2013, madres de niños de la edad de kinder a 80. grado se reuniéron en la Escuela católica de San Nicolás en Evanston para un panel de discusión abierta dirigida por Sergio D. Hernández, M.A. y facilitada por 3 otros especialistas en salud mental. El tema inicial de la discusión, dada la circunstancia alrededor de la pérdida de una persona importante en la parroquia, se enfocó en cómo hablar con los niños sobre el luto y pérdida de seres queridos. El propósito general de la junta era poder ayudar a los padres a mejorar la comunicación con sus hijos en varios temas. Las madres rápidamente comenzaron a discutir los beneficios así como las desventajas  en el uso de la tecnología en las vidas de sus niños. Muchas expresaron que sus hijos, dadas las presiones sociales y particularmente de las escuelas, estaban causando que muchos pierdan lentamente su conección familiar. Una madre comentó frustrada que su sentido de responsabilidad como madre era proveerle a sus hijos con las herramientas para ser exitosos, pero que el precio que estaba pagando su vida familiar era bastante alto.

Las madres fueron dadas varios recursos y fuentes de información así como ideas que pueden comenzar a poner en práctica en casa con sus hijos, por ejemplo: la redacción de contratos que ambos, padres e hijos tienen que cumplir; planeamiento de reuniones familiares tales como excursiones, cenas y otras experiencias que produzcan un ambiente viable y familiar; pero también el permitir que los niños experimenten sus propias consecuencias y decepciones tempranamente en sus vidas. Los padres conjuntamente acordaron que la paternidad como una sola unidad era difícil y las madres deseaban que los padres colaboren en la puesta en marcha de un plan más viable para la crianza de sus hijos. Por último, las presentes deseaban tener más reuniones en las que la información útil se pudiése difundir, ya que su tiempo mientras esperaban por sus hijos fue agradable, informativo, y muy productivo.

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St. Nick’s Parish/Pope John XXIII – Program Dates

NRCI is hosting programming in Spanish for the families at St. Nick’s/Pope John XXIII in Evanston on the following dates:

October 12
November 9
January 18
February 8
March 29

Stay tuned for the fliers with more information on each specific program/date.

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The information for Suicide Prevention Awareness Month is still being compiled, but we now have available the presentation slides for:

Why Present Suicide – Presentation – Copy

LGBT Suicide ppt DeFeo

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Family-Centered Programs at St. Nick’s Parish

St. Nick’s Program – October 12

NRCI is hosting a series of programs for the Spanish-speaking community at St. Nick’s Parish in Evanston.  These programs are geared toward families, especially those with school-aged children, as mental health professionals share their experiences and tips to parents in how to have healthy relationships with their children.  Among the topics that will be discussed are: advocating for your child, bullying, substance abuse, and disciplining your child.

The first of these sessions will be held on October 12 (Saturday) by Sergio Hernandez.

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JOIN NRCI AND THE CHICAGO SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (TCSPP) FOR THIS YEAR’S OUT OF THE DARKNESS WALK!

This walk is geared toward raising awareness and funds for suicide prevention research, education, and advocacy.  To join and/or donate, please click here.

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Suicide Prevention Awareness Month Kicks off at TCSPP!

NRCI has partnered up with community professionals and TCSPP faculty & staff for a variety of programs for Suicide Prevention Awareness Month, and this week, we hosted two at the TCSPP Chicago Campus.

On September 10, we welcomed Andy Weiss, Lynn Nash, and Tim Burnett for the “Veterans and the Military: Suicide after Service” panel presentation.  Tim is a student and a member of the military who is working on his dissertation here at TCSPP.  He provided various statistics on veteran and military suicides and his own point of view on the issue, while also moderating the dialogue with Lynn and Andy.  Both Lynn and Andy were on hand to share their experiences, as both are survivors of their sons, who died of suicide. This powerful and informative discussion was well-attended and well-received by the TCSPP community.
The audio for this presentation will be available through this website soon.

On September 12, we held a presentation on Suicide Prevention and the Loss from Suicide, which included discussions led by Dr. Nancy Zarse, TCSPP Forensic Psychology faculty, Steve Moore from the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP), Rev. Cheryl Magrini from the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance (DBSA), and Jessica Mead from Catholic Charities’ LOSS Program.  Each person on the panel brought his/her expertise to the presentation, giving a comprehensive look and intricate views on approaches for suicide prevention, as well as the importance of supporting those who have lost loved ones to suicide.  Aside from the focus on students’ professional development, handled especially by Dr. Zarse, the three other panelists are great resources for professionals and consumers.
The audio for this presentation will be available here soon, but in the meantime, here is the contact information for our presenters who are not part of the TCSPP community:

Rev. Cheryl Magrini
Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance
magrinicheryl@gmail.com

Mr. Steve Moore
c/o April Jervis
American Foundation for Suicide Prevention – IL
ajervis@afsp.org

Ms. Jessica Mead
LOSS Program
jmead@catholiccharities.net

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Check the 2014 Conference UPDATES page (on the homepage, bottom center) for important information on events and programming relating to the 2014 Conference and the topic for this year: suicide.

Already up is the schedule for September programming at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology for Suicide Prevention Awareness Month!

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Youth Mental First Aid Training
August 12, 2013

NRCI Fellow Marianne Cabrera attended the Community Counseling Centers of Chicago’s (C4) Youth Mental Health First Aid Training with TCSPP students Michelle Horner and Mallory Zehe.  The three became certified in youth mental health first aid, which is geared toward being a “first responder” of sorts in suicide prevention and crisis intervention.  The three will work together on developing suicide prevention protocols and programs for NRCI, its partners, and the TCSPP community.

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Girls in the Game – Teen Workshops
July 30, 2013

Program developers Carolyn Wott and Leah Spolarich have been working with GIrls in the Game during their summer camp.  GIrls in the Game works with teenaged girls in underserved communities to develop their physical, mental, emotional, and social skills through the use of sports and various workshops.  This summer, Carolyn and Leah are presenting on self-injury, substance abuse, eating disorders, and body image — all very salient topics in today’s society, especially for young women.  The two program developers work with around fifteen (15) teenagers and five GIrls in the Game coaches during each presentation, and have been successful in fostering and cultivating great discussions on these difficult topics of conversation.

NRCI hopes to continue this relationship with Girls in the Game in the upcoming schoolyear.

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2013 NRCI Annual Mental Health Conference – Great Success!
June 11, 2013

On June 2, NRCI hosted its 12th Annual Mental Health Conference at the Beth Emet Synagogue in Evanston.  This year’s Conference, focused on trauma, drew in about 300 professionals and consumers to discuss the variety of issues related to this incredibly important topic.  Tonier Cain, Dr. Cassandra Kisiel, and Dr. Bradley Stolbach served as this year’s panel, with Dr. Michael Horowitz as their moderator.  Mr. Larry Cohen gave the opening remarks, graciously thanking everyone for taking the time to attend an event close to his and his wife Marilyn’s hearts.  In addition, Rabbi Eleanor Smith gave a moving spiritual message that resonated with consumers and professionals alike.

This great event included informative and engaging discussion groups, as well as brought together a host of organizations in the exhibit hall to share information about their services with those in attendance.

This year’s Conference seems to have outdone itself, as glowing reviews have poured in from attendees:
“Tonier’s presentation was the most powerful one I’ve ever experienced.”
“Best ever… everything was perfect!”
“Thank you Cohens for this wonderful conference honoring their daughter Naomi. They are an inspiration to me as a mother of someone who suffers from mental illness, as well as to me as a professional. Thank you for your work to combat stigma for all our daughters and sons futures.”

Media coverage of the event has also provided positive feedback on this year’s Conference.  Click here for the Medill Chicago Reports’ write-up on this year’s NRCI Conference.

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“Living with Bipolar Disorder” screening
May 13, 2013

On May 10, NRCI partnered with the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) to host a special screening of “Living with Bipolar Disease.”  This informative and touching film followed four individuals and their experiences with bipolar disease and included commentary by a psychologist affiliated with AFSP.  This great program garnered much attention from TCSPP students and staff, as well as mental health professionals and those touched by bipolar disease.  Members of the audience shared their experiences on treatments and living with bipolar disease, while a psychologist specializing in bipolar disease fielded questions.  NRCI and AFSP plan to jointly host this program annually to raise awareness and provide information and education on this topic.

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Positive Parenting at St. Nick’s in Evanston
April 22, 2013

NRCI partnered up with Ms. Claudia Hinton to do a special workshop at St. Nick’s parish in Evanston on positive parenting on April 6.  This presentation done in Spanish focused on how to raise healthy, happy and positive children, especially in a society that so often displays negative behaviors such as violence and bullying.  Ms. Hinton spoke to parents in the community about activities and conversations that they can have with their children in order to promote healthy mental and emotional states for their kids.  The root of Ms. Hinton’s presentation can be summed up with this quote from her: “What is a happy and confident child? A child that is curious and open about others and the world around them while feeling accepted and loved.”

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Panel Presentation on the Stigma of Hair Loss
April 16, 2013

On April 16, NRCI hosted a panel presentation on the stigma of hair loss at the Chicago School.  This physical condition makes a significant impact on a person’s mental health, and NRCI explored the issue from three different perspectives: alopecia (with Kellie Leeper from the Suburban-Chicago Alopecia Support Group), chemotherapy (with Jamie Mazer from Gilda’s Club), and trichotillomania (with Jane Bodine from the Trichotillomania Support Group of Greater Chicago).  The three panelists shared insight on each of their fields of expertise, including treatments, coping mechanisms, available support systems, different approaches for different age groups, and the like.

 

 

 

 

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Panel Presentation on Suicide at TCSPP
April 10, 2013

On April 9, NRCI hosted a panel on the stigma of suicide at the Chicago School, and it was met with great attendance from the school community.  The panel presentation was moderated by NRCI’s own Associate Director Erica Rumpel, and the panelists were: Jessica Mead (Intake Coordinator and Therapist for the LOSS Program), Mary Ann Rowan and Judy Nolan (survivors and volunteer facilitators from the LOSS Program), and Steve Moore (Board of Directors Member and survivor from the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention).  The information and emotional panel drew questions from the crowd, while providing moving and helpful insights for the students.

NRCI will be hosting another panel next Tuesday, April 16, at TCSPP on the stigma of not having hair (alopecia, chemotherapy, and trichotillomania).

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Police Officer Suicide: Civic Reflection at the Chicago School
March 27, 2013

The Chicago School’s Director of Community Partnerships, Jill Glenn, along with Bockarie Lansana, led a Civic Reflection discussion on the Chicago campus on March 20, 2013.  This civic reflection focused on an article discussed by Larry Cohen during this year’s Cultural Impact Conference, and it is an important and relevant topic in today’s society, especially here in the greater Chicago area.  With the suicides of police officers on the rise, we must start to look at ways to help them cope with job pressures, personal troubles, and the like, in hopes of preventing officer suicide from becoming more of a “trend.”

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Raising a Happy and Confident Child Through Love and Discipline: A Workshop with NRCI at Pope John XXIII in Evanston
March 19, 2013 

On Saturday, April 6, the Naomi Ruth Cohen Institute (NRCI) will host a program in Spanish that will focus on positive parenting.  This workshop, which is open to the whole community, will feature Ms. Claudia Hinton, MA, LPC, who will discuss various tools and approaches to help parents guide their children in making good decisions, feeling happy, and gaining confidence.  Aside from providing a presentation on raising happy confident children, Ms. Hinton will be available for questions from the attendants.  Per Ms. Hinton, the discussion will be focused on “What is a happy and confident child? A child that is curious and open about others and the world around them while feeling accepted and loved.”

This workshop will take place at:

Pope John XXIII (part of St. Nicholas Catholic Church)
1120 Washington St., Evanston IL
April 6, 2013 at 9:30am

For questions, please call NRCI at 312.467.2552 or email us at NRCInstitute@thechicagoschool.edu.

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Cultural Impact Conference featured Lawrence Cohen as Guest Speaker
February 19, 2013

The Chicago School of Professional Psychology (TCSPP) held its annual Cultural Impact Conference on February 8 at the Holiday Inn Chicago Mart Plaza.  In addition to keynote speaker David Finch, New York Times  best-selling author of The Journal of Best Practices, the Conference featured NRCI’s very own co-founder Lawrence Cohen as a guest speaker. Mr. Cohen joined Mr. Finch and other notable speakers, discussing the impact of stigma on the lives on individuals and their loved ones.

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February Program at St. Nick’s/Pope John XXIII
February 18, 2013 

NRCI hosted an informative presentation with St. Nick’s/Pope John XXIII in Evanston that focused on the dangers of substance abuse. On February 9, Hector Hernandez of PEER Services led a discussion on prevention and helpful services for those with substance abuse issues, especially teenagers and families with children.  Mr. Hernandez was joined by Miguel Jimenez of Evanston Substance Abuse Prevention, who spoke about services available to those seeking help for this issue.

The next program at St. Nick’s is slated for April 6, and it will focus on positive parenting.

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January Program at St. Nick’s/Pope John XXIII
February 18, 2013 

NRCI continues its long-standing partnership with St. Nick’s as we kicked off the year with a presentation by Dr. Paula Castillo on sexuality. Dr. Castillo focused on the topic of families talking about sexuality and how to approach this issue with children.  The discussion also featured topics such as body appreciation, anatomy terminology, and explanations on bodily changes with age.

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STIGMA Panel at TCSPP
February 18, 2013

On January 31, NRCI hosted an esteemed panel of professionals to discuss the issue of stigma in its many forms.  In particular, the panel focused on stigma as it relates to HIV/AIDS, leprosy, and cancer.  Dr. Chate DeLoach of TCSPP served as the moderator for this panel, which featured Rebecca Fritz of Gilda’s Club, Michael Valdez of TPAN, and Krishna Gurung of KRMEF.  Mr. Gurung hails from Nepal and is responsible for developing a sustainable community for survivors of leprosy.  The panel delved into issues such as the impact of stigma, how to overcome it, and the hardships of stigma on individuals and their loved ones.  This enlightening panel discussion allowed for these professionals to share their personal experiences and expertise on the subject.

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Bullying: What is it?  Why is it happening? How can I stop it?
December 5th, 2012

Bulldog SolutionInc. visited St. Nick’s Pope John Paul XXIII School on Saturday November 17th 2012, to present in the second installment of the Mental Health Series for parents of Latino children. Luissa Ziccarelli of Bulldog Solution, Inc. presented to an intimate audience of parents that allowed for a safe open discussion about bullying.  She educated parents in how to identify, prevent, and stop bullying while encouraging open dialogue and peer support. Bulldog Solution, Inc. typically uses real stories, social media, and role-plays to work on understanding the different types of bullying that may otherwise go unnoticed. Parents learned the definitions of bullying, relational aggression, and cyberbullying and were provided strategies, tools, and resources to assess and resolve the conflict. Interested in learning more or hosting Bulldog at your organization?  Please visit http://www.bulldogsolution.com/.

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Children & Bullying: When to Seek Help
November 4th, 2012

On October 27th, 2012, the Naomi Ruth Cohen Institute (NRCI) held its first program for a new Mental Health Series at the Pope John Paul XIII School in Evanston.  Facilitators Nancy Sussman of NAMI-CCNS and the Chicago School’s Mayra Chacon and Dr. Theresa Segura Herrera led Latino parents of K-8th graders through a discussion about childhood depression and anxiety.  The Psychologists covered symptoms and signs, how to seek professional help, and how to manage anxiety and/or depression specifically related to the immigrant experience, acculturation, and the formation of a bi-cultural identity.  After a 30 minute introductory presentation, parents asked a variety of questions based on personal experiences, current challenges, and family problems. An engaged discussion ensued and a list of mental health resources, tips, and warning signs for depression and anxiety were distributed.

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12th Annual Mental Health Conference: TRAUMA
June 2, 2013 (Sunday) 

The impact of Trauma is realized by every age group, race, ethnicity, socio-economic group, gender, community, and workforce.

Our panel this year:

  • Cassandra Kisiel, Ph.D. Dr. Kisiel is a Research Assistant Professor at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Principal Investigator and Project Co-Director for the Treatment Services and Adaptation Center of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network, and a trauma consultant and Project Director for the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services.
  • Bradley Stolbach, Ph.D. Dr. Stolbach is an Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics at the University of Chicago, Pritzker School of Medicine. He is the supervisor of Trauma-Related Psychological Services at La Rabida Children’s Hospital and Project Director of La Rabida’s Chicago Child Trauma Center. He is President of the Board of Directors of the Children’s Advocacy Centers of Illinois.
  • Tonier Cain is a consumer advocate with a powerful story to share. She is a courageous survivor of childhood abuse, addiction, unrelenting violence, and numerous incarcerations. Ms. Cain exemplifies the resiliency of the human spirit and now through her own professional work, widely promotes that “where there’s breath, there’s hope.” She is currently team leader for the National Center for Trauma-Informed Care, within the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors.

More details to follow. For questions, please contact us at 312-467-2552.


Bud Billiken Day Parade and Picnic
August 11, 2012 

NRCI made its first appearance at the 83rd Annual Bud Billiken Day Parade & Picnic on Chicago’s South side. Bud Billiken is the largest and oldest African-American parade in the United States, with a focus on celebrating going “Back to School.” Volunteers from TCSPP, coordinated by Community Partnerships Department Fellow Kara Norlander, hosted a tent and provided free
school supplies to hundreds of young students. Each child filled out a card to answer the question
“What is your favorite thing about yourself?” All parents, teachers and community workers were provided info on services offered by NRCI. Free workshops addressing youth needs–such as
stress management, bullying, depression and anxiety—were offered for organizations who wish to schedule them. Supplies were provided by a Learn & Serve Grant.